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This Instagram Account Puts Timothée Chalamet In Famous Artworks, And It’s Perfect

Timothée Chalamet might be the most promising actor of his generation, and he’s even inspired the best artworks.

Have you ever looked at a person and thought that they totally belong to another time in history, based on the depiction of those times through art, mainly paintings? That’s exactly what happens with Academy-Award nominee Timothée Chalamet. His face reminds us of those portraits of young men that we can find in art galleries around the world. And, apparently, many people think that as well since he’s become a viral internet sensation, with many inserting his unique face in famous artworks, and it’s just perfection!

Chalamet began his career at a very young age with brief appearances on television shows such as Law & Order, when he was just fourteen years old. However, his big break came in 2017 with his performance as Elio Perlman in Luca Guadagnino’s Call Me by Your Name. Not only did the movie put him on the spotlight, but it also made him one of the most promising young actors of his generation, getting multiple nominations, including one for an Academy Award in a leading role.

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It was actually this film what originated the craze of placing him on artworks. First appeared Call Me by Monet (@cmbynmonet, you must take a look at these as well), an Instagram account that takes scenes from the film and places them in some of Monet’s most mesmerizing impressionist landscapes. But the one that went viral is definitely @chalametinart, created by a woman named Anna (who prefers being in anonymity) who felt inspired by the photography of the film and Chalamet’s unique expressions and features.

This account’s bio reads: “turns out Timothée Chalamet has been an inspiration to artists as far back as da Vinci.” And she’s not wrong. You just have to take a look at the images to see how well he fits in them, something not many could brag about. According to the genius behind these pictures, it all came to her while watching the movie and realizing “that each and every scene of the movie resembles a classical painting.” So, let’s just leave Timothée Chalamet speak for himself.

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Boy with a Basket of Fruit (c.1593) by Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio

David (1501-1504) by Michelangelo

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The Music Lesson or Lady at the Virginals with a Gentleman (1662-1665) by Johannes Vermeer

A Young Man with a Basket of Fruit (Personification of 'Summer') (1640) by Bartolomé Esteban Murillo

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Portrait of Emile Gallé (1892) by Victor Prouvé

A Coign Of Vantage (1895) by Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema

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Au Moulin de la Galette (1892) by Ramon Casas

Young Man Reading (1892) by Octavian Smigelschi 

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The Lute Player (c.1595) by Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio

The Blossom of Youth (1889) by Władysław Czachórski

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Portrait of Madame X (1884) by John Singer Sargent

George Gordon Byron, 6th Baron Byron (1813) by Richard Westall

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Lady Agnew of Lochnaw (1892) by John Singer Sargent

The Empress Eugenie Surrounded by her Ladies in Waiting (1855) by Franz Xaver Winterhalter

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The Swing (1767) by Jean-Honoré Fragonard 

The Desperate Man (1845) by Gustave Courbet 

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The Flower Seller on the Champs Elysees (1862 - 1942) by Louis Marie de SchryverRead more:
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