How To Create A Minimalist Outfit Inspired By Japanese Art

How To Create A Minimalist Outfit Inspired By Japanese Art

By: Carolina Romero -



The Great Wave Off Kaganawa
was the art piece that catapulted Katsushika Hokusai to fame. This Japanese artist became renowned among the French impressionists during the twenties due to his technique and artistry. This piece may be simple, but is full of life.

A vibrant blue captures our gaze. Mount Fuji stands out discreetly in the background and all of our attention is drawn to the imposing wave. The great mountain, which appears insignificant when compared to the might of the sea, looks on as two wooden boats collide head on with the heaving waters. There are many ways to read into this painting. My favorite is deeply philosophical, it conceives the mountain as the permanent essence of reality, while the wave represents transitory adversities in life. What we can say for sure is that this woodblock print has become a reference in the Japanese culture.

japanese art fashion the great wave
Fashion is a language that interacts with all the different aspects of reality. We can apply the main foundations of Japanese aesthetic to the clothes we wear. The result will be a super comfortable outfit that is also elegant and sophisticated. Bellow you'll find some ways to reflect Japanese philosophy and art in fashion.

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Plain and subtle

You can wear partially revealing clothing without looking vulgar. Choose neutral colors and combine a slim fit top with Japanese style pants. The waistline will make your shape look more stylized, while the pants will make your legs look more sculpted. A good option is to use open shoes. You will feel fresh and light, besides achieving a harmonic look.

japanese art fashion subtle
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Natural Tranquility

Two important aesthetic principles of Japanese art are tranquility and nature. You'll feel better using cotton clothes because they are more elastic and fresh. Black will always make you look elegant without the need to go over the top. You can wear this style with an open dress or skinny jeans and a wide clean blazer. Be careful not to overload your outfit. You can combine these clothes with white items like shoes to achieve visual harmony.

japanese art fashion only black
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Harmony of imperfection

In Japanese art, imperfection is another paramount element. This means that everything is shown as it really is: irregular, ever changing, and contradictory. So feel free to choose clothes with irregular shapes and combine them with a blouse or shirt in a neutral color. As for accessories, make sure they complement the colors of your outfit. Don't go all matchy-matchy now!

japanese art fashion harmony
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Spontaneity and simplicity

Anything spontaneous is simple, and that's where it draws its beauty from. You can feel fresh, comfortable, and sexy at the same time if you wear a long skirt and a black or white top or t-shirt. If you use accessories, just make sure they are small and discreet to keep the harmony of the whole outfit.

japanese art fashion simplicity
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Relaxed balance

If looking elegant is what you want, you can give this kind of jumpsuit a try. They will make you feel fresh, plus the waistline or belt will stylize your figure. Clothing with one single color will give your look a touch of sophistication and balance. You can wear any type of shoes you want: whether they are high or kitten heels, open toed... you'll still look good. 

japanese art fashion balance

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Remember: less is more. A complete outfit can be achieved with only one or two pieces of clothing. It is possible to feel comfortable and look good. Open shoes are comfortable and can also look classy.

Japanese philosophy and artistic expressions can be a valuable source of inspiration for our life and style. Although clothing may seem a little superficial, it has the power to convey our feelings and appease our mood. Our personal style always says something about us. 

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Sources:
Conoce Japón


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