ADVERTISING

LIFESTYLE

Monarch butterfly enters endangered species list and all due to human activity

The monarch butterfly was declared as part of the endangered species red list of the IUCN.

Officially, the migratory monarch butterfly, (danaus plexippus plexippus) that travels across America entered the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species in the “Endangered” category. The causes are not unknown, the butterfly is threatened by habitat destruction and climate change.

Today’s list includes 147,517 species, of which 41,459 are directly threatened with extinction. Among them is the iconic butterfly that travels through the forests of Canada, United States, and Mexico each year.

ADVERTISING - CONTINUE READING BELOW

“Today’s Red List update highlights the fragility of nature’s wonders, such as the unique spectacle of monarch butterflies migrating thousands of miles.” - Dr. Bruno Oberle, IUCN Director General.

What’s behind the disappearance of the monarch butterfly

Specifically, it is the subspecies of the monarch butterfly, danaus plexippus, which has declined between 22% and 72% of its population in just 10 years. One of the main causes of this serious decline is illegal and legal deforestation for agriculture and urban development in their habitat.

ADVERTISING - CONTINUE READING BELOW

Amongst other causes are the usage of herbicides and pesticides that are directly damaging the plant on which the butterfly larvae feed: the milkweed. But it’s not all about crops and habitat loss, monarch butterflies are at great risk from the impact of climate change.

We may be tired of hearing “climate change” or “crisis” by now, but behind the balance are those actions that drastically transform the planet’s cycles. It’s not just logging or agriculture, are droughts that limit plant growth, increased fires, extreme temperatures, and a whole chain of events that diminish the likelihood of life.

ADVERTISING - CONTINUE READING BELOW

The biggest blow to the West


Although the monarch butterfly is distributed in various parts of the Americas, it is in the west where the population has declined drastically. The risk of extinction for the western population is a big one, since out of 10 million butterflies there are now only 1,914 specimens. In less than a decade it has decreased 99.9%.

On the other hand, the eastern population recorded a drop of 84% between 1996 and 2014. Neither is a scenario with much hope.

ADVERTISING - CONTINUE READING BELOW

Everywhere you look there are opportunities to help the monarch butterfly or its habitat, whether in your food choices, your use of your car, or simply caring for the forests. There is always something to do if we are willing to help.

Story originally published in Ecoosfera

ADVERTISING - CONTINUE READING BELOW
Podría interesarte
ADVERTISING
ADVERTISING