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Winnie the Pooh joins the public domain; a cringey slasher is already on its way

After being abandoned by Christopher Robin, Winnie the Pooh and Piglet turn into feral creatures ready to catch some preys.

Every year tons of works end their copyright protection and enter the public domain. This year Winnie the Pooh, one of the most iconic and beloved characters, joined the list of works in the public domain. Worry not, the classic Disney character is still under protection, however, the company no longer has the rights over the original book character created by A.A. Milne.

The original yellow, honey-lover bear can now be used by literally everyone; it has just been announced that a very peculiar (and quite gory) horror film has finished shooting. Winnie the Pooh: Blood and Honey, directed by Rhys Waterfield, will tell a different story than the one we know. After being abandoned by Christopher Robin, Winnie the Pooh and Piglet are thirsty for revenge, blood, and honey (because we can’t have a Winnie the Pooh that doesn’t love honey, right?).

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In the few stills published by the production, who are speedily working on the edits to release it as soon as possible, we can see our beloved childhood characters in a very different fashion and acting in a very violent manner. As explained by Watefield himself, “Christopher Robin has pulled away from them, and he’s not given them food, it’s made Pooh and Piglet’s life quite difficult.” This has mainly turned them into feral creatures acting on instinct and violence: “they’re like a vicious bear and pig who want to go around and try and find prey.”

Although Waterfield wants to keep quality above all, the film was only shot in 10 days. As a matter of fact, it was shot in England near the forest that inspired A.A. Milne’s Hundred Acre Wood in the books. He also mentioned that he doesn’t want viewers to expect the film to have the production and investment of a Hollywood film, but rather to enjoy the balance between horror, comedy, and the satire of a character no one would imagine in this scenario.

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“When you try and do a film like this, and it’s a really wacky concept, it’s very easy to go down a route where nothing is scary and it’s just really ridiculous and really, like, stupid. And we wanted to go between the two.”

When the film was announced, public response was overwhelming something that Waterfield both appreciates but fears. Not only does he want to deliver a film that matches the expectations, but he’s also wondering what will Disney do about the film. It’s clear that he’s not going for Disney’s well-known imagery, which legally has his head covered, but will the company simply allow the name of a character they’re so attached to be turned into this slasher villain?

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