ADVERTISING

PHOTOGRAPHY

Images of Snowflakes under the Macroscopic Lens Are a Visual Poetry

Photographer Alexey Kljatov has developed his skills in snowflake photography with macroscopic snapshots.

When the winter season arrives in the regions closest to the poles, snow makes its presence felt and the parade of snowflakes falling poetically on the surface begins. Mountains of whitish material pile up on the landscapes and give an appearance of peace with their pristine color, but if you look at them under the microscope suddenly the wild beauty comes into view, and the fractal nature becomes evident and surprises all its viewers.

Photographer Alexey Kljatov is a lover of snowflakes and has developed his skills to the point of photographing them in interesting macroscopic snapshots. On his website, he publishes many of his artworks taken from his balcony and in full natural light, which makes evident the fractal-like structure of the naturally formed ice fragments.

ADVERTISING - CONTINUE READING BELOW

[Photo: Alexey Kljatov]

“Real snow crystals are amazing objects for macro photography, thanks to their beauty, uniqueness, and unlimited diversity,” Kljatov explains on his website. And contrary to what many may think, Alexey himself clarifies that this is not as complex and expensive a task as many often think.

“Some people think that snowflake photography is a complex affair and requires expensive equipment, but in reality, it can be inexpensive, very interesting, and quite easy, after a little practice,” he says.

ADVERTISING - CONTINUE READING BELOW

[Photo: Alexey Kljatov]

Snowflakes Under the Lens

As described on his website, Kljatov uses an unconventional homemade technique known as the macro lens reversal technique, meaning that although he might place the flakes under the lens of the microscope, he actually uses camera lenses to get to capture the incredible details in his snapshots.

The photographer mounts a lens upside down in front of his camera that has a maximum optical zoom of 6x and in this way, achieves much finer details than the macro mode already built into some smart cameras. It’s a simple way to play with lens magnification and achieve results that could only be obtained with much more expensive equipment.

ADVERTISING - CONTINUE READING BELOW

[Photo: Alexey Kljatov]

His favorite place to capture snowflakes is his balcony, as less than half of it is covered by a roof, so he has access to natural light to help illuminate his macro photography. The result is simply poetic and reminds us of how amazing nature can be when it comes to geometry.

Story originally published in Spanish in Ecoosfera

ADVERTISING - CONTINUE READING BELOW
Podría interesarte
ADVERTISING
ADVERTISING