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This is how the lunar eclipse was seen in different parts of the world (photos)

Citizens from all over the world shared several photographs of the past total lunar eclipse, the last of 2022 and the only one for the next 3 years.

November gave us the last lunar eclipse of 2022, which was also very special since there will not be another astronomical event like it for at least three years. The Earth’s natural satellite was completely obscured as it crossed the shadow cast by the Earth and turned its color to ochre. Photography and cosmos lovers were in charge of capturing the event from different parts of the world, and shared their photos to show us how the eclipse was experienced, here you can find the amazing views.

November 2022 Eclipse

Between the night of November 7 and the early morning of November 8, the telescopes were prepared to admire the last total lunar eclipse of 2022, a special event because the next event with these characteristics will occur until March 14, 2025. Although the cosmos will not deprive us completely of eclipses, they will only be partial and penumbral.

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The Sun-Earth-Moon alignment began at 2:02 am GMT-6 on November 8 and reached its maximum splendor at 4:17 am when the Moon was completely engulfed in the darkness of the shadow cast by the Earth.

The eclipse could be seen in North and Central America, as well as in Ecuador, Colombia, and some regions of Venezuela and Peru. On the other side of the world, it could also be seen in Australia, New Zealand, and Asia.

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NASA organized a complete coverage of the eclipse through its official YouTube channel and later shared a high-speed timelapse of the Blood Moon that you can watch on its official website.

But it has been the citizen observers themselves from different parts of the world, who have shared different views of the eclipse through a series of photographs where you can admire the past eclipse of November 8 in its maximum splendor. Keep scrolling down and enjoy the astronomical spectacle that gave us the recent alignment of our host star, the planet Earth and its natural satellite.

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[Photo: Erik Tochimani]

[Photo: Erik Tochimani]

[Photo: NASA]

[Photo: Ariel Atienza]

[Photo: Garth Battista]

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[Photo: Barbara Hoth]

[Photo: Reuters]

[Photo: Reuters]

[Photo: Reuters]

[Photo: Reuters]

[Photo: Reuters]

Story originally published in Spanish in Ecoosfera

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