ADVERTISING

TECHNOLOGY

The Biological Theory That Claims Telepathy Exists

Have you ever thought what would it be like to have telepathy? Imagine if you could read not only someone else’s mind, but actually the thoughts from each one of your ancestors. What if I told you we're already living in a telepathic connection to all of the living beings in the planet?

In the eighties, Cambridge scholar Rupert Sheldrake came up with a holistic theory that would rattle the scientific community to the core. After his secular training in biology, he went to an ashram in India where he came up with the theory of what he called “morphic resonance.”

ADVERTISING - CONTINUE READING BELOW

In 1981, Sheldrake exposed the theory in his best-selling book A New Science of Life. There, Sheldrake explains a vision where self-organizing systems, such as our thoughts, inherit a type of memory from other similar systems that preceded it. The central concept behind this notion is that the laws of nature don’t work as a given, but rather like habits. In a kind of Platonic fashion, the theory claims that memory is not something we store within our brain, but we rather remember things from the systems that came before us. It states that similar fields of information (“morphs”) reverberate and exchange information within a universal life force that nurtures us all. In a sense, he believes that people are not substantially different from a hive mind, but rather live under an illusion of individuality.

This complex idea also states that not all biological inheritance is coded in our DNA or in its epigenetic modifications, but also in the “morphic resonance” from our ancestors.He claims that much of what we are is both a consequence of our genetic code, as well what was programmed outside of it, which he calls "morphs," patterns and recurring habits encoded within nature and our species.

ADVERTISING - CONTINUE READING BELOW

From resonance to Carl Jung's theories of the collective unconscious, Sheldrake stated that individuals inherit a collective memory and that each individual, through their own experience, affects this entity as well. In his eyes, the lives of every creature echo patterns that determine the nature of our world and society. His hypothesis states that while each species shares patterns, its individual members also have a type of telepathy. Living creatures can sense certain things, even if they don’t directly perceive them through the five senses. The theory states that a person who’s being stared at, without notice, can tell what’s happening. Likewise, Sheldrake’s idea also stretched so far as to say that dogs could tell when their owners were arriving home because they also experienced some kind of ethereal connection.

Offbeat as it sounds, Sheldrake’s theory stirred the scientific community during the eighties. The implications of this thought could have changed the whole paradigm of how we perceive nature and life itself, but all the experiments that have tried to prove this hypothesis have failed. Sheldrake, however, still stands along with the idea, and as of today, A New Science Of Life is still a best-seller.

ADVERTISING - CONTINUE READING BELOW

Would you stand with his theory? 

Paintings by acclaimed Hong Kong artist Simon Birch

Check out:

The Depressing Theory That Explains Why Aliens Don't Reach Out To Us

ADVERTISING - CONTINUE READING BELOW

Why Despite Your Evolved Complex You Still Believe In The Zodiac

Podría interesarte
ADVERTISING
ADVERTISING