ART PHOTOGRAPHY MOVIES HISTORY BOOKS MUSIC DESIGN LIFESTYLE FASHION TECHNOLOGY

All rights reserved 2017 ©
© Cultura Colectiva

The Test To See If You Have What It Takes To Be A Tinder Success

7 de noviembre de 2017

María Isabel Carrasco Cara Chards

The BBC posted a test where you can see if you're online dating material, as well as some ideas to succeeding.

Oh Tinder, I never got what all the buzz around the app was about. Well, I never really liked it as much as people seem to enjoy it. The first time I actually saw it was on a friend's phone. He used it to talk to girls, but he never actually had the courage to meet them in person, which only reinforced one of my main concerns. However, after having some fun with his account, I decided to give it a chance. I just used it for a couple of days and decided this wasn't for me. Why? The main reason: I was startled about how direct guys were. They greeted you and the very next message was an invitation to have sex. Not that I'm super conservative, but I'm not gonna hook up with someone who only says hi and pretends that's enough. So, I uninstalled the app from my phone and never got it back.



Then one day I came across a test from the BBC claiming to tell you if you have what it takes to succeed in the online dating world according to scientific studies. Honestly, not being a user of any, I would have let it pass, but it made me think that perhaps I was doing something wrong to give these creeps the impression that I would just sleep with anybody. Long story short, I decided to take the test, and the results were… let's say, interesting.



The test claims it was based on the research studies by Professor Khalid Khan (from Queen Mary University of London) and Dr. Sameer Chaudhry (from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center). However, right after naming their sources they just add that at the same time they analyzed “dozens of scientific studies from recent decades on attraction and online dating.” And that's the last thing you hear about these specialists from then on it's all about “some studies,” “in one research,” “scientists believe,” and so on. So, it basically loses some credibility.


Now, what's the test about? Through six questions you're given options you can choose from to build a mock account. It includes things like the gender you're interested in, username, bio, profile pictures, and general tastes. As soon as I started it, I knew I was going to have issues with the test. After selecting the gender you're interested in, they asked what kind of username I would choose based on four adjectives describing myself, which included: cultured, hottie, megabucks, and take a chance with me. I selected cultured, not really in a pretentious way, but because I found the others quite problematic. Naturally, as I expected, once my results came in, cultured was the less popular among men based on “certain” study. Now, if my original profile didn’t have anything insinuating, and I got those creepy advances, I can’t imagine how it would be with a username like the others.




Then you have to select a headline or what we generally know as bio. Here you could choose from four opening lines or descriptions based on personality. These included jokey, elaborate (which was basically showing off your knowledge as it was later described), brief (just one word, “me”), and curious (“ Chocolate digestive or custard cream?”). The result here wasn’t a surprise. According to these unknown studies, humor, as we already know, is one of the qualities most people look after. However, something that made me cringe a little bit was the fact that they mentioned that selecting the elaborate option was a flop, since men don’t really feel that attracted to women who claim to know more than them.



Among the description, you could choose three options to explain your personality, and in order to make this brief, some of the options included playing rugby or being funny and witty. I mention these two because the test says these two options are the worst among the bunch. The first one, because men prefer a woman who attends aerobics classes over one who plays rugby. From this moment on, I confirmed that the test was based on outdated and kind of misogynistic principles. Now, I get it’s based on the general opinion of the people they tested, but if they had something against them, they could’ve phrased it differently or used another tone to give you the results. As for the other option, this just made me laugh. They claim that saying you’re witty and funny doesn’t make you look attractive simply because actions are better than words. For God’s sake! It’s a digital app. How can you show with actions that?


Images by Frankie Hildebrand


What would you do if you're caught in the apocalypse single?

How do you survive a long distance relationship?

TAGS: love advice
SOURCES: BBC

María Isabel Carrasco Cara Chards


Articulista Bilingüe CC+

  COMMENTS

  More of Cultura Colectiva

Here's Why Claudia Romo Edelman Believes You Can Change The World 6 Reasons That'll Finally Convince You To Learn A Foreign Language Brutally Honest: 10 "Closer" Quotes For Those Who Stopped Believing in Love What We Think About Kylie Jenner's New Birthday Collection Thierry Noir, The Artist Who First Used The Berlin Wall As His Canvas To Defy Repression 5 Benefits Of Aloe Vera You Should Know To Start Using It

  RECOMMENDED