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These towns got flooded on purpose but constantly emerge back

These sites were forgotten but surfaced decades after their destruction.

There are magical sites that have been preserved over the centuries, and that when visited, generate wonder among people who are amazed by the architectural, natural, and cultural beauty they possess.

Perhaps one of the mysteries that always causes curiosity is that of the places submerged underwater. Throughout history, many towns have been flooded either by nature’s wrath or by people’s interests and unfortunately, their population had to flee, displacing the hundreds that once inhabited them.

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These towns below were flooded on purpose, but constructions of what were once towns have survived the flood and re-emerged after years, even after being centuries underwater.

Taxhimay Zone, Mexico

According to the official website of the government of Estado de Mexico, the history of this place dates back to the 16th century, when the town of San Luis de las Peras, of Otomí origin, was established in these lands.

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It was in 1934 when General Lázaro Cárdenas, President of Mexico at that time, decided to evict the town to create a dam to supply water to the state of Hidalgo. In this way, the settlements of this site were submerged at the bottom of the water, which years later resurfaced, and is now considered a tourist attraction.

Aceredo, Spain

In the 1990s an ancient village located in the municipality of Lobios, in Spain, was buried underwater, but every year it re-emerges, leaving locals and tourists fascinated.

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It was as a result of the construction of a reservoir in Portugal, which in 1992 swallowed several villages, amid a revolt, as the 120 neighbors who inhabited this place opposed being evicted. In the end, they had to abandon their homes, and Aceredo was submerged in this area, as well as four other villages: A Reloeira, Buscalque, O Bao, and Lantemil.

Derwent, England

This town was also submerged on purpose to build the Ladybower reservoir because cities such as Derby, Leicester, Nottingham, and Sheffield expanded in the mid-twentieth century and required a dam to supply water. At first, they planned to build the dam further up the valley to save the town. Eventually, they realized that this was not enough, and the site had to be removed.

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Work began in 1935, and by 1945 Derwent was under water. Nowadays, when the summer heat arrives, the water levels drop drastically, so the remains of this town can be seen by tourists who visit. During particularly hot summers, water levels in Ladybower Reservoir can drop enough that the remains of Derwent are once again visible, and visitors can stroll among its ruins.

Story originally published in Spanish in Cultura Colectiva

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