ADVERTISING

ART

Were cave paintings the “emojis” of prehistoric times?

The same paintings and symbols appear in several caves around the world suggesting a universal language as emojis have become for today’s world.

There are things that most of us take for granted. Language is one of h. We rarely think about all that had to happen before we could articulate a word and communicate through anything more than signs, sounds, or representations of reality. Or simply, everything that had to happen before we had emojis...

Other prejudices, such as thinking that we are the only ones with a complex communication system, are very common. But a hard fact that seemed irrefutable, that is, that human language could not be more than 5,000 years old, has been put in doubt by findings that take us back to the Stone Age, showing us how little we still know about ourselves and our ancestors.

ADVERTISING - CONTINUE READING BELOW

Take a look at this: Humans Arrived In America Thousands Of Years Earlier Than Thought

The Prehistoric emojis

In Mesopotamia, Sumerian astronomers made their calculations from carved pictograms - the so-called cuneiform script - and great stories were documented using this technique. But contrary to what was believed until recently, these carvings were more than representations: they also included abstract concepts. In other words, the ancestors of our adjectives, verbs, prepositions, or adverbs.

ADVERTISING - CONTINUE READING BELOW

But if until recently it was not known that the Sumerians had a more complex written language than was believed in the 19th century, what else have we missed? Perhaps, from knowing that the markings carved on prehistoric caves around the world are more than artistic representations. They are also abstract symbols. Language.

According to research conducted by anthropologist Genevieve von Petzinger, an abstract language already existed in the Stone Age, and it was universal. A kind of ancestor of the now indispensable emojis, according to Petzinger in an interview with NatGeo.

ADVERTISING - CONTINUE READING BELOW

Petzinger’s explorations (she and her husband spent 300 hours underground in 52 different caves in France, Spain, Portugal, and Italy for two years) show that there are also features of abstract language that were shared by our ancestors.

Symbols found in caves all over the world

Petzinger, who has an amazing Ted Talk lecture, defines her work as an attempt to understand humanity through the vestiges of the past:

ADVERTISING - CONTINUE READING BELOW

“I study some of the oldest art in the world. It was created by these early artists in Europe some 10,000 to 40,000 years ago. I don’t just study it because it’s beautiful-although it certainly is; what interests me is the development of the modern mind.”

And it’s true: creativity, imagination, and abstract thinking are constants in the human condition. Thinking about it, it doesn’t matter how far we are from our Paleolithic ancestors, or how much we continue to evolve: there will still be universal elements that make us commune beyond time and space, as shown by the written language of the caves.

ADVERTISING - CONTINUE READING BELOW

Text courtesy of Ecoosfera

Podría interesarte
ADVERTISING
ADVERTISING