ADVERTISING

HISTORY

Devastating Fires Are Ravaging The Amazon, And Humans Are To Blame

Giant fires are destroying the Amazon rainforest at unprecedented rates due to deforestation and man-made climate change.

A good-sized region in the Amazon rainforest has been ravaged by devastating fires for weeks already, sending gigantic smoke columns up to the atmosphere. The smoke and devastation is so extensive that it can clearly be seen from space.

NASA

ADVERTISING - CONTINUE READING BELOW

The fires

NASA recently released images of the ongoing tragedy, which were captured by the Agency's Aqua satellite on August 11 and August 13. NOAA-20 also took a disturbing picture, shown below. 

The fires have engulfed big portions of the Brazilian states of Rondônia, Amazonas, Pará, and Mato Grosso.

ADVERTISING - CONTINUE READING BELOW

NOAA-20

Is this normal?

Fire activity in and by itself is not unheard of in the Amazon. Each year, between July and November, farmers deliberately set their fields ablaze ahead of the dry season, to clear and fertilize land for new crops.

ADVERTISING - CONTINUE READING BELOW

But the sheer size, intensity, and duration of the latest fires is far from normal, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). "Wildfires there today are caused by a combination of droughts and human activity," the administration said in their site. "The intensity and frequency of droughts in turn, have been linked with increases in regional deforestation and anthropogenic climate change."

The catastrophe led Amazonas to declare a state of emergency just last week, as reported by EuroNews.

ADVERTISING - CONTINUE READING BELOW

Why this is a big deal

It's important to note that, overall, the Amazon rainforest has been relatively immune to fire due to its natural high humidity and moisture, which are easily produced and retained by the sheer amount of canopies throughout the jungles. Deforestation and man-made climate change has altered this balance, however, setting up the stage for disaster.

According to NOAA, the Amazon rainforest has already experienced three major droughts, the size of which would usually be seen once in a century at most, in the last few years—one in 2005, one in 2010, and the latest in 2015. Let that sink in for a minute.

ADVERTISING - CONTINUE READING BELOW

It's difficult to overstate just how big of a deal the Amazon rainforest is for almost all ecosystems across the globe. Its destruction will not only harm South America: it will utterly annihilate ecological communities and countries in basically every continent, including the US. It's time to speak up as much as we can to prevent this from happening. 

Other articles for you:
Trump's New Laws Endanger American Species Like Bald Eagles And Grizzly Bears
350 Million Trees In 12 Hours: Ethiopia's Crazy Environmental Feat
Warning: Devastating Heatwave Set To Hit The US Over The Next Days

ADVERTISING - CONTINUE READING BELOW
Podría interesarte
ADVERTISING
ADVERTISING