The Destructive And Burning Love Story Of Jim Morrison
Music

The Destructive And Burning Love Story Of Jim Morrison

Avatar of Angie Pamela

By: Angie Pamela

March 28, 2017

Music The Destructive And Burning Love Story Of Jim Morrison
Avatar of Angie Pamela

By: Angie Pamela

March 28, 2017



True love is like a shifting kaleidoscope that will change depending on each individual's perspective. Love has as many faces as there are colors in the world. Crazy, obsessive, destructive, passionate, endearing, innocent, and wild are just a few of its facets. Perhaps the most powerful and overwhelming to the heart is intense love and very few times does it cross people's path. Intense is a word that could perfectly describe the love shared between Jim and Pam.



Pamela Courson Jim Morrisons love couple-w636-h600

Pamela Courson was a muse who inspired many of Jim Morrison's songs and poems like "Love Street," "Queen of the Highway," or "Twentieth Century Fox." She was the woman who made the Lizard King bend down in acquiesce. A queen that accompanied her king until his final days, she was the source of his inspiration and downfall.


Pamela Courson Jim Morrisons love branch-w636-h600

They met when she was only 19 years old and he was 22. Pam was the daughter of the headmaster of a public school, and since she was a little, she showed signs of a rebellious spirit. She has been described as a wild, independent, and lonely being with a mysterious vibe. While she was very intelligent, academia wasn't her passion, so she decided to drop out of school and pursue an artistic career in Los Angeles along with a friend. 
Clearly, her personality embodied all the characteristics of a sixties' youth: a life of excess that focused on the present without showing any concern for the future, and above all, the pursuit of pleasure. 
Pamela was an avid hedonist. These characteristics without a doubt attracted Mr. Mojo Risin'.
In Los Angeles she was introduced to the world of drugs and rock. It has been said that Pam was also the muse behind Neil Young's famous "Cinnamon Girl."


Pamela Courson Jim Morrisons love mandala-w636-h600

She met Jim Morrison at the London Fog, a venue where The Doors played before becoming famous. Both saw each other as wild, independent, emotionally unstable people, unable to commit to someone apart from their vices.
Their personalities were so similar that clashes were inevitable; however, Jim always saw her as his soulmate, his "cosmic partner." From the start it was a tormented relationship, filled with arguments, violence, and infidelity from both sides. It's well known that Jim once set fire to a room where Pam had locked herself in after punching him. Luckily she was able to escape in time. However, after each adventure, fight, and argument, they always went back together.


It would seem that both were conscious of their own self-destruction. Neither could stop their consumption of heroin and alcohol. The fire of their relationship burned so hotly they were destined to extinguish each other. Pam didn't want Jim to continue his career with The Doors, and she constantly threatened with leaving him if he didn't abandon the band.

She saw him as a poet who was superior to the band's music. After recording his last album in 1971, L.A. Woman, Jim left the band and moved with Pamela to Paris, where he devoted himself to his poetry. They spent a few months in peace, until July 3 of that year, when the Lizard King was found dead in mysterious conditions. The official report stated that he died due to an overdose.


Pamela Courson Jim Morrisons love beard-w636-h600

In his will, Morrison appointed Pamela as his only heir, which provoked the suspicion of many who believed she was behind his death. However, during the next three years, Pamela became trapped in a spiral of vices, decadence, and madness. She still referred to herself as Jim Morrison's wife, and would even tell people that she was expecting a call from him. Finally, her drug addiction led her to a mortal overdose in 1974. Both star-crossed lovers died at the age of 27.

Pam was the one who encouraged Jim to continue with his poetry –something he truly loved– and publish his two poetry books.Despite the torment and difficult moments in the relationship, they profoundly loved each other.


Pamela Courson Jim Morrisons love back and white-w636-h600

There's a lot of fascination surrounding impossible loves and the way they can change a person. These loves come once in a lifetime, and can be our salvation or destruction. These loves can ignite a fire, with flames as red as Pamela's hair.

As Jim sang:

I found my own true love was on a blue Sunday
She looked at me and told me
I was the only one in the world
Now I have found my girl
My girl awaits for me in tender time
My girl is mine, she is the world
She is my girl
La, la, la, la


::
Translated by María Isabel Carrasco Cara Chards


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